Go Back   Cigar Weekly Community Forums and Discussion Groups > Smoking Post > The Cedar Room

The Cedar Room A place for cigar storage and cigar accessories discussions.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-07-2006, 11:41 AM   #1
coppertop
Starting Member
 
coppertop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Leavenworth
Posts: 42
Advice on building a cabinet humidor

Does anybody here have some experience with this? I've got almost every aspect covered except the spanish cedar. I've looked at prices, thickness, and the prices are all reletively the same. But I can go with a veneer and save some serious cash, but I don't want to at the expense of my cigars. So, I guess my question is will a veneer work as well as a 1/8" thick board? A veneer will be about half the thickness of the 1/8" board. I know why Spanish cedar is used, besides those reasons (dries without warping, resistant to dry wood termites, highly resistant to decay....) is there any other reasons I would need to use pieces thicker then what would get with a veneer? Thanks for any help anyone can provide. Any words of wisdom from people who have built, or attempted to build a cabinet humidor in the past.
__________________
take one smoke and your head spins around and around

B.O.P.II
coppertop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 12:14 PM   #2
SmoKerch
Herf God
 
SmoKerch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Indiana
Posts: 23,413
I haven't built one, but 1/4" would seem like the minimum thickness of Spanish Cedar.

1/8" is barely more than veneer itself.

Remember, the s.p. is not just for the aroma and spiciness it imparts to the cigars. It is also a humidity buffer/control device.

That and the beetle/bug control thingy.
__________________
Kercheval Bros. LLP
Professional Procrastination Consultants
1 - (900) - GO# - SAND

The Great State of Confusion

Just because I may be paranoid, it doesn't mean there aren't people out there trying to get me.


"I remember when 'liberal' meant being generous with your own money."--Will Rogers.

Visit us on The Facebook: Kercheval Bros. Procrastination Consultants !
SmoKerch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 06:30 PM   #3
Bob Staebell
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: TX
Posts: 122
coppertop,
If the wall thicknessof the cabinet is 3/4" & a neutral aroma wood like mahogany, you only need spanish cedar for the shelves, drawers, & trimout. That 3/4 thickness of material will provide an adequate "buffer".

As far as aroma, the cedar used for drawers, etc when combined with the cedar in the boxes will give you the nice balanced aroma of cedar desired.

Depending on size of the cabinet, one can use either passive humidifciation or active. The more full you make the cabinet the easier it will be to maintain RH....another fine reason to order more cigars.....

Cheers,
Bob Staebell
Bob Staebell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 07:15 PM   #4
qajariaq
Contributing Editor
Club Member
 
qajariaq's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 2,678
Just to elaborate on Mr. Staebell's excellent advice, the type of mahogany used can make a difference.

Honduran ("true") mahogany, or swietenia macrophylla is considered a good substitute for spanish cedar. The two are actually related.

African mahogany, or khaya species, is not considered a good substitute. Its a totally different wood species all together, and varies in properties much more so than Honduran mahogany and its relatives.

I used honduran mahogany in my humidor cabinet (3/8" thick) and it has worked out nicely. I store everything in spanish cedar boxes, though.
qajariaq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 07:26 PM   #5
coppertop
Starting Member
 
coppertop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Leavenworth
Posts: 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Staebell
coppertop,
If the wall thicknessof the cabinet is 3/4" & a neutral aroma wood like mahogany, you only need spanish cedar for the shelves, drawers, & trimout. That 3/4 thickness of material will provide an adequate "buffer".

As far as aroma, the cedar used for drawers, etc when combined with the cedar in the boxes will give you the nice balanced aroma of cedar desired.

Depending on size of the cabinet, one can use either passive humidifciation or active. The more full you make the cabinet the easier it will be to maintain RH....another fine reason to order more cigars.....

Cheers,
Bob Staebell
Bob,

Thank you, I hadn't expected a reply from the man himself. What if I was to use a really nice plywood (like a mahogany wood) could I still get away with not doing the entire inside in spanish cedar? Also, what do you mean by trimout?

Thanks for your help,

Mike
__________________
take one smoke and your head spins around and around

B.O.P.II
coppertop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 08:56 PM   #6
NullSmurf
Starting Member
 
NullSmurf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Aurora, Colorado
Posts: 13
I co-opted a kitchen cabinet during my almost completed kitchen remodel. Please accept this link to CigarPass where I documented my trivulations.

http://www.cigarpass.com/forums/inde...howtopic=21879

I would add that lining the cabinet isn't necessary. The point of the spanish cedar is to buffer your RH. You can accomplish this by using boxes and as I did, by using it on the shelves. Its 1/4" thick, by the way. I also miscalculated in thinking that the tight joints at the back were tight enough. They leaked. I sealed with hot glue. Its inert (non toxic) and gets the job done.

Lastly, I had to add stand alone air fresheners (without the scent, of course) to move the air around. These take a single D cell battery and operate one minute in 5 or some such.
__________________
Bruce
NullSmurf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2006, 09:50 PM   #7
mrwood
Member
 
mrwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: chicago usa.
Posts: 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by NullSmurf
I co-opted a kitchen cabinet during my almost completed kitchen remodel....
I like this idea!
The trays look great !
mrwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2006, 04:14 AM   #8
Bob Staebell
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: TX
Posts: 122
Mike,
I am not a fan of traditional plywood. The veneer--substrate interface has small voids which can allow the veneer to potentially delaminate over time. I would suggest a mahogany bonded to an high quality MDF core. Much greater stability & no movement.

Cheers,
Bob
Bob Staebell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2006, 04:17 AM   #9
coppertop
Starting Member
 
coppertop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Leavenworth
Posts: 42
Thank you everyone, you've been a tremendious help. Bob I will look into the MDF boards today. Thanks again.

Mike
__________________
take one smoke and your head spins around and around

B.O.P.II
coppertop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2006, 06:24 PM   #10
qajariaq
Contributing Editor
Club Member
 
qajariaq's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 2,678
Speaking of MDF, has anyone that's used MDF expensively in humidor construction ever had problems with formaldehyde fumes from the resin used in its manufacture in the finished humidor?

There are some formaldehyde-free MDF products on the market, as well as other toxin-free sheet goods made of various materials. but you'll pay a premium for them - if you can find them.

Maybe its not an issue.... ?
qajariaq is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:02 PM.