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jefslat
01-03-2018, 09:14 PM
Hákarl or Lutefisk?

I don't think I'd eat either on a dare.

vernonator
01-04-2018, 06:53 AM
Hákarl or Lutefisk?

I don't think I'd eat either on a dare.

I have tried Lutefisk....why on EARTH anyone still makes it is beyond me. It was "invented" as a way to preserve fish in the age before....well ANY technology. Its just plain NASTY NASTY NASTY, and we have these things called FREEZERS that do wonders.

My BIL claims he loves it...I call BS but he likes to think of himself as an old Norseman....:headbang::nope:

BigJohn
01-04-2018, 07:37 AM
isn't lutefisk just salt cured fish? So you soak it in water for a few hours ...?

grtrx
01-04-2018, 08:22 AM
lutefisk is salted fish and lye, it is, after soaking, the consistency of a giant snot

I have, in the spirit of I will try anything once, had it and I will never do it again.

Hakarl is shark which has rotted, strong ammonia flavor from what I have heard, I have not tried it.

You might want to try surstromming which is fermented herring, and is the Swedish entry in the smelliest thing you can eat. I have only read about it.

Fermented/rotted can be a good thing, it can also be revolting, again I eat a lot of stuff you all won't so me saying revolting should be taken as a warning :rofl:

BigJohn
01-04-2018, 08:38 AM
Ahh, the lye... i forgot about that. Yeah, well, no.

beevod
01-04-2018, 08:43 AM
Tastes much like boiled beaver.

BigO
01-04-2018, 08:49 AM
I have not found any way to use salted cod and make it palatable. Do love pickled herring, though.

grtrx
01-04-2018, 09:15 AM
croquetas de bacalao are really good...

vernonator
01-05-2018, 07:18 AM
I have not found any way to use salted cod and make it palatable. Do love pickled herring, though.

Agreed...loves me some pickled herring but that's the extent.

TommyBB
01-05-2018, 10:44 AM
Jeff Smith, the Frugal Gaymet, had a decent recipe for bacalá with aromatic vegetbales. I made it a couple years consecutively for Christmas. I'm not a huge vegetable person, but this was edible.

EVERYONE that I asked about it all said "WHY????" Even cousins from my Mom's generation,and my Mom, all said they'd "rather catch a whippin' than eat codfish."

This looks like it. I did without the tomatoes. (http://www.recipelink.com/msgbrd/board_3/1998/MAY/698.html)

grtrx
01-05-2018, 11:10 AM
I've had salt cod in Spain and Portugal and it was great, but then again I eat a lot of stuff you plural don't like

SLR
01-05-2018, 06:56 PM
This YouTube vid says it all...

https://youtu.be/KUzQoDXH-04

KatDad
01-06-2018, 07:10 AM
This YouTube vid says it all...

https://youtu.be/KUzQoDXH-04

:lol: That second bite was way too big!

Briandg
01-07-2018, 12:07 AM
I've seen snapping turtle boogers that looked far more edible.

kevie49
01-07-2018, 09:36 AM
Growing up on the island, fish was always a huge part of our diet, including salt fish. However it is an acquired taste. My favourite is salt herring, the best way to cook it is fill a pan with cold water, add the herring bring to the boil. Then dump out the water and repeat the process, however this time when it comes to the boil let it simmer for 15 minutes and best served with tatties and a glass of milk.

Bigger fish like salt cod or ling should be treated slightly differently. Place in a pan, fill the pan with cold water and leave it soaking overnight. In my experience the best way to cook it is to steam the fish fir about 15 minutes.

If you like salt fish then I highly recommend the guga, but it's only legal to eat that on the island (we have it protected as part of the culture). Guga has the taste of salt herring, but the texture of goose. They are only allowed to hunt the guga one or two weeks a year, the locals go out to Sula Sgeir to get them.

beevod
01-07-2018, 09:38 AM
I think I once saw a guga buying underwear at a Walmart

TommyBB
01-08-2018, 06:44 AM
Growing up on the island, fish was always a huge part of our diet, including salt fish. However it is an acquired taste. My favourite is salt herring, the best way to cook it is fill a pan with cold water, add the herring bring to the boil. Then dump out the water and repeat the process, however this time when it comes to the boil let it simmer for 15 minutes and best served with tatties and a glass of milk.

Bigger fish like salt cod or ling should be treated slightly differently. Place in a pan, fill the pan with cold water and leave it soaking overnight. In my experience the best way to cook it is to steam the fish fir about 15 minutes.

If you like salt fish then I highly recommend the guga, but it's only legal to eat that on the island (we have it protected as part of the culture). Guga has the taste of salt herring, but the texture of goose. They are only allowed to hunt the guga one or two weeks a year, the locals go out to Sula Sgeir to get them.
Thank you for that. A different perspective than ours, to be certain, and something for folks to seek out. GrtRx will be along shortly on his next trip! :lol::notworthy:

grtrx
01-08-2018, 07:05 AM
Thank you for that. A different perspective than ours, to be certain, and something for folks to seek out. GrtRx will be along shortly on his next trip! :lol::notworthy:

why indeed I will :rofl::rofl:

Briandg
01-08-2018, 03:44 PM
I'm not sure how I missed you joining, but welcome.

It sounds to me as if you dry salt the stuff to dehydrate it, then soak it to take the salt back out, and that process will change the fish a lot. Can't imagine what it's like.

It reminds me of two things. Mummification was performed with a product called natron, essentially sodium salts. bury the thing in this dust and it draws out the water to preserve the tissues, and the sodium salts and alkalinity kill off any potential contamination.

The process reminds me of something that the people here in missouri eat, it's called Poke Weed. Poke weed must be picked when it is just sprouting, then you must boil it for a half hour, and you must change the water three times. Eaten raw it can even kill you. Just a few berries.

Well, my mother in law grew up as a sharecropper in arkansas, and she took my wife out to harvest weeds every year. the family would be sick as coons for a couple days every time. So I asked my wife. 'did she change the water out twice?' No, she just put it in and boiled it into mush.

I asked her once why she fixed poke for the family. she said that it tastes just like turnip greens, but it's free.



Growing up on the island, fish was always a huge part of our diet, including salt fish. However it is an acquired taste. My favourite is salt herring, the best way to cook it is fill a pan with cold water, add the herring bring to the boil. Then dump out the water and repeat the process, however this time when it comes to the boil let it simmer for 15 minutes and best served with tatties and a glass of milk.

Bigger fish like salt cod or ling should be treated slightly differently. Place in a pan, fill the pan with cold water and leave it soaking overnight. In my experience the best way to cook it is to steam the fish fir about 15 minutes.

If you like salt fish then I highly recommend the guga, but it's only legal to eat that on the island (we have it protected as part of the culture). Guga has the taste of salt herring, but the texture of goose. They are only allowed to hunt the guga one or two weeks a year, the locals go out to Sula Sgeir to get them.

kevie49
01-08-2018, 03:56 PM
I'm not sure how I missed you joining, but welcome.

It reminds me of two things. Mummification was performed with a product called natron, essentially sodium salts. bury the thing in this dust and it draws out the water to preserve the tissues, and the sodium salts and alkalinity kill off any potential contamination.


Firstly thanks for the welcome.

Your right on the mummification point. The salting of fish and meat goes back to a time when people didn't have fridges and they needed a way to store their food over longer periods. Immersing the fish or meat in salt stops it rotting and also makes the flesh pretty solid. This isn't an issue for a very soft fish like herring or makarel, also very greasy/oily meats like duck and goose take very well to salting. But with a lot of other things they need to have a lit of the salt removed to make it paletable and also to rehydrate the meat so that it doesn't remain solid (it will go like beef Jerry otherwise).

grtrx
01-09-2018, 06:16 AM
salt curing things like hams goes back centuries

yes indeed salting was how you could transport protein pre refrigeration, its why the Basque ended up in Canada catching and salting and drying cod. Salt and cod are intertwined in the history of Europe.

The history of salt also is the history of humankind.

as to the palatability of salted meat and fish, I am pretty sure it tasted better than starvation