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gui_tarzan
06-03-2013, 05:20 PM
I don't like lobster, it has a funny aroma and taste to me. Strangely enough, scallops do too only it's a stronger aroma. Not fishy, not spoiled, just odd and it is the same with fresh or frozen. But the weird thing is it makes me nauseous when I cook them. Why? I absolutely love seafood including clams and shrimp so why do lobster and scallops turn my stomach when I smell them cooking? More so scallops because they're done in a pan. I don't get it.

carmine7075
06-03-2013, 05:38 PM
Could be the beginning of shellfish allergy? Well that, or maybe you just don't like them. ;) :lol:

Get some skate or black tip and see if you like it. They taste very similar to scallops, maybe better than what makes it to the Michigan market, and you would have no shellfish issues.

gui_tarzan
06-03-2013, 05:39 PM
No shellfish allergies. I just wondered if I'm the only one that can smell a stark difference in them.

carmine7075
06-03-2013, 05:47 PM
My serious guess is that what you are getting in your local market isn't as fresh as it could or should be, and there is plenty of room for mishandling shellfish by the time its get delivered to locales far from its origin. The shellfish is possibly smelling "off", which is a smell that you would not like, and it being past its prime could easily make you feel nauseous.

Careful with shellfish allergy though, it can come out of nowhere, almost like its a cumulative effect in some people.

carmine7075
06-03-2013, 05:51 PM
I do think scallops and lobster smell different from one another and both different from clams. Though, really fresh seafood smells mostly of the sea, like a salty sweetness. Imo, once it starts smelling of more than that its past its prime.

The old saying is a good fish market should not smell like fish.

Bowie Fan
06-03-2013, 05:52 PM
Genetics??

Were you ever given the PTC (Phenylthiocarbamide)test in school? Some say PTC has a bitter taste, while others experience no taste at all. You either have the PTC gene or you don't.

Same with ability to smell certain odors, like "asparagus urine", for example.

gui_tarzan
06-03-2013, 06:33 PM
I have not had that test but I can definitely tell when I've eaten asparagus and it's also a very offensive odor to me. My sense of smell has always been very sharp along with my sense of color and audio tone.

Carmine, you mentioned a salty-sweetness. There is a distinctive overly-sweet smell to scallops to me. Again, I have no concerns about the scallops I bought being fresh, my nose is very, very sensitive.

Briandg
06-03-2013, 08:07 PM
Some inforkmation. A scallop, as you see it, is only a small part of the animal, it is only the muscle that opens the shell. The rest of the beast is discarded. Call it the white meat.

There's some taste similarities to lobster, but in reality, they aren't even in the same genera. Totally different critters.

IMO, you just don't like scallops, and something about the smell turns your stomach. Nothing unusual there, some people react like that to various things, with or without a discernible reason. So being able to eat clams and oysters but not being able to tolerate "white meat" scallops is sort of like loving steak but being repelled by the smell of ham. Nothing unusual here, as far as I can see.

btw, my wife loves crab. Lobster? Uh uhh. Kinda turns her stomach.:dunno:

Bowie Fan
06-04-2013, 04:14 AM
How about mussels? Now, imo, that is one foul tasting and smelling shellfish! Sometimes people add them to spaghetti sauce; taints the whole batch.

grtrx
06-04-2013, 04:39 AM
scallops are often treated with a solution (phosphates if I recall correctly) to keep them 'plump'.

http://fshn.ifas.ufl.edu/seafood/sst/AnnPdf/18th_418.pdf

that might make one sick, but I have not researched to see if the symptoms you describe are associated with that solution

carmine7075
06-04-2013, 04:51 AM
Some inforkmation. A scallop, as you see it, is only a small part of the animal, it is only the muscle that opens the shell. The rest of the beast is discarded. Call it the white meat.

There's some taste similarities to lobster, but in reality, they aren't even in the same genera. Totally different critters.

IMO, you just don't like scallops, and something about the smell turns your stomach. Nothing unusual there, some people react like that to various things, with or without a discernible reason. So being able to eat clams and oysters but not being able to tolerate "white meat" scallops is sort of like loving steak but being repelled by the smell of ham. Nothing unusual here, as far as I can see.

btw, my wife loves crab. Lobster? Uh uhh. Kinda turns her stomach.:dunno:


Yep, you can actually clean them with a shop vac.

Also, one quick example of what I was talking about earlier . . . I love fresh bay scallops, but I do not like the shipped frozen, then thawed and sold at the grosto bay scallops at all.

carmine7075
06-04-2013, 04:54 AM
How about mussels? Now, imo, that is one foul tasting and smelling shellfish! Sometimes people add them to spaghetti sauce; taints the whole batch.

Mussels are super difficult to keep alive and fresh. I wouldn't eat them unless I knew where and when they were harvested and how they were handled prior to cooking.

macsauce13
06-04-2013, 04:57 AM
btw, my wife loves crab. Lobster? Uh uhh. Kinda turns her stomach.:dunno:

Brian, I'm a HUGE seafood eater, and am very similar to your wife. LOVE crab, but lobster doesn't do anything for me. It just tastes chewy and cheap. Give me scallops and crab over lobster any day of the week.

Also, for a very simple but delicious scallop recipe:

1. Remove feet from fresh scallops
2. Coat both sides in kosher salt
3. Chop 1-2 cloves of garlic and heat in a pan with butter to hot
4. When butter is completely melted and garlic is beginning to brown, put 1/4
teaspoon of red chili flakes into the pan.
5. When chili begins to darken place scallops on the pan. Let them sit without
moving for 2 minutes.
6. Flip scallops and let cook for additional 1 minute.

Serve.

Very simple, but SO delicious. I like to let both sides of the scallops brown a bit, so your time may vary a little.

mannish
06-04-2013, 05:16 AM
I like crab, lobster, shrimp but not real fond of scallops. I tried mussels for the first time about a month ago they were good but nothing I would go out of my way to eat

BigJohn
06-04-2013, 05:50 AM
I like fish. Crab is ok, Lobster too. I find scallops to be ok but quite sweet - even the super duper fresh kind you'd find in a great restaurant in boston, for example... I can eat shrimp by the pound...
Salmon, grouper, 'sea bass', branzino, all quite tasty little fishes. if it has tenticles, please don't bring it to my plate...

carmine7075
06-04-2013, 06:00 AM
I take them! Squid and octopus can be delicious too.

One thing I love is fresh Conch made into bahamian style conch salad, served as cracked conch or on a conch burger. Put a side of Bahamian peas and rice on the plate with it, and I am a happy man.

Fritters are good too, but the others are better.

We don't have conch here, but we have whelk, and it also makes a pretty good "conch" salad. You just have to let it sit in the citric acid a little longer to tenderize. On a good day I can collect two or three from a local spot I know, which is more that enough to make a nice big batch of salad with some left over for pasta sauce down the line.

BigO
06-04-2013, 06:43 AM
I think it's just a personal preference. I have a similar reaction to watermelon. Can't stand even the smell of it (my kids love it and I have to cut it for them, but I still cringe when asked to) and artificial watermelon candy makes me retch from the smell of it.

I haven't found a seafood I don't like (although canned mackerel is pretty damned close), but I have preferences as well. I love roughy and grouper and flounder but not so fond of tillapia (I contend it is a fish for people who don't like fish). I prefer shrimp to lobster and think that crawfish is more work than it's worth.

Even so, I rarely have a hankering for seafood like I do other foods.

mannish
06-04-2013, 06:54 AM
why is grouper so expensive

can you compare roughy to something - it is good for grilling

i usually stick with mahi - used tillapia for a long time but got tired of it kind of nothing to it

I do something with shrimp about once a week

was frying catfish fairly often until we got a batch of bad fishy catfish that kind of put an end to that for now.

BigO
06-04-2013, 07:32 AM
Having fished for grouper personally, they're hard to catch. They dive for their holes and cut the lines on the sharp edges when they get there.

My first suggestion for a roughy substitute would have been mahi. My favorite fish to grill is wahoo, but it isn't commercially fished.

Weber makes a mango-lime seasoning that I absolutely love on fish. That seasoning and lime juice squeezed on it at the end of cooking (grill or oven) is fantastic.

fvfanmc
06-04-2013, 07:49 AM
Let's bring snails into the topic. I like sea snails, but for years now, the only snails available have been sand snails. I don't like sand snails.

Stuffed squid in pasta sauce is very delicious.

carmine7075
06-04-2013, 07:59 AM
Having fished for grouper personally, they're hard to catch. They dive for their holes and cut the lines on the sharp edges when they get there.

My first suggestion for a roughy substitute would have been mahi. My favorite fish to grill is wahoo, but it isn't commercially fished.

Weber makes a mango-lime seasoning that I absolutely love on fish. That seasoning and lime juice squeezed on it at the end of cooking (grill or oven) is fantastic.

Kind of funny, Orange Roughy, or Slimehead as it was known before the marketing company tried to sell it at Publix, was originally brought to market as a substitute for Grouper when their populations were way down, and the price went sky high, a decade and half or more ago.

What they didn't know at the time, iirc, was that slimhead are slow reproducers that take a long while to grow to mating sizes, and they very nearly fished them out.

Then they came out with King Clip, to replace the slimehead and grouper, which iirc was actually some type of pacific eel.

Now, thankfully, farm raised talapia is taking some the pressure off of the the good eating domestic fish so the rest of us, who know better that to eat chinese farm raised fish, will have more tasty domestic fishes left for us. :u: :)

carmine7075
06-04-2013, 08:08 AM
why is grouper so expensive

can you compare roughy to something - it is good for grilling

i usually stick with mahi - used tillapia for a long time but got tired of it kind of nothing to it

I do something with shrimp about once a week

was frying catfish fairly often until we got a batch of bad fishy catfish that kind of put an end to that for now.

Grouper is expensive for a couple of reasons. First, most of the fishery is closed to harvest. Second, the remaining species are somewhat depleted resulting in a limited supply and demand for grouper is high.

Roughy was similar in texture to grouper. Hmmm . . . fresh Mahi is really tough to beat.

Some of the snappers are really good if you can get them in your area.

If you want a good grilling inshore fish, try redfish. Leave the skin on brown the filet briefly then flip to the skin side to finish cooking. I prefer it blackened, but it would also be good prepared in most other ways you would make something like roughy or grouper.