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Herf
03-28-2013, 05:22 PM
I got an Easter Ham that didn't come with its own glaze package. I need ideas for a glaze that doesn't contain any pineapple (Mrs. Herf won't eat it). I'm thinking of OJ and brown sugar but I'm open to suggestions.

OregonDuck
03-28-2013, 05:28 PM
I've made one with brown sugar and honey that was excellent. You can also add spices such as cinnnamon, allspice, bay, etc

Mad Dawg
03-28-2013, 05:37 PM
Mustard Baked Ham

1-1/2 tsp whole cloves
1/2 cu dark brown sugar
3 Tbsp whole-grain mustard
1 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme
1/2 tsp finely chopped rosemary
1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 cu orange juice

Trim all but 1/4" of fat from ham. Score ham in a diamond pattern. Stud with cloves at each scored intersection.

Place ham in a medium roasting pan. Combine remaining ingredients except OJ and pat seasoning mix evenly over ham.

Pour OJ in roast pan and place in low rack of 350 degree oven. Bake until internal temp reaches 140 degrees (~10-12 minutes/pound), basting with pan liquid every 20 minutes. Tent with aluminum foil if glaze begins to burn.

When done, remove from oven and let rest 15 minutes before slicing.

:drool:

mealstrom
03-28-2013, 05:50 PM
I did this a few years back and haven't turned back since:

1. Slice the ham for full flavor exposure
2. Stick it in a crock pot and generously coat it with brown sugar and a couple cups of cranberry juice. A little powdered mustard gives it a little kick too, but I never really notice it (Tiara does).
3. Let it cook for a few hours, then take it out before it gets tough.

Best ham I've ever eaten!

Jester
03-28-2013, 07:21 PM
Mustard Baked Ham

1-1/2 tsp whole cloves
1/2 cu dark brown sugar
3 Tbsp whole-grain mustard
1 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme
1/2 tsp finely chopped rosemary
1/4 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1 cu orange juice

Trim all but 1/4" of fat from ham. Score ham in a diamond pattern. Stud with cloves at each scored intersection.

Place ham in a medium roasting pan. Combine remaining ingredients except OJ and pat seasoning mix evenly over ham.

Pour OJ in roast pan and place in low rack of 350 degree oven. Bake until internal temp reaches 140 degrees (~10-12 minutes/pound), basting with pan liquid every 20 minutes. Tent with aluminum foil if glaze begins to burn.

When done, remove from oven and let rest 15 minutes before slicing.

:drool:

I'd go with this. I do something similar and it is always a crowd pleaser.

Best,
J.

Gamle-ged
03-28-2013, 07:42 PM
1) Drive to a drive-through

2) Order a Number 3 Easter Dinner-to-go...

Briandg
03-28-2013, 10:53 PM
It's kind of funny. I'd like to try a glazed ham someday, but if you even broach the idea with my wife, she honestly, genuinely comes completely unglued.

BigO
03-29-2013, 02:22 AM
I've had good luck with an apple jelly-Tabasco glaze. Melt the jelly in the microwave and stir in Tabasco to taste.

capper
03-29-2013, 03:32 AM
We'll be smoking a whole ham this year. I'll put my own rub on it and throw it on the smoker. The brown sugar in the rub make a nice glaze and the smokiness can't be beat.

fvfanmc
03-29-2013, 05:53 AM
I am one of the few people that don't like ham.

Osmond
03-29-2013, 06:24 AM
I am one of the few people that don't like ham.

So I'm not alone? Makes me feel less special somehow.

It will be steaks on the grill for Easter Sunday.

RusticCharm
03-29-2013, 07:58 PM
Equal parts of brown sugar, soy sauce, and mustard.

Mad Dawg
03-30-2013, 07:17 AM
Soy sauce? Ham's not salty enough as it is? :dunno:

flipflop
03-30-2013, 08:16 AM
Soy sauce? Ham's not salty enough as it is? :dunno:

Rustic must be quoting the Heart Attack Grill recipe.

Briandg
03-31-2013, 03:10 AM
I wondered about that myself. I wondered if he meant teryaki, but that just sounds gross.

Briandg
03-31-2013, 03:12 AM
personally, I love ham. Good ham. Don't care for bacon, but I'll eat pork of any other kind. when I slow cook pork loin on my smoker, god, it's just done, and so tender and juicy that you could almost mistake it for beef tenderloin. The flavor's not the same, of course, but the meat is just as good.

RusticCharm
03-31-2013, 10:11 AM
I meant soy sauce. Blood pressure 120/72. Not too bad for someone 68 years old.

fvfanmc
03-31-2013, 10:33 AM
I wonder why rabbit isn't eaten on Easter. :dunno: ;)

mannish
03-31-2013, 01:27 PM
fried pork chops, mashed taters, green beans - although I do like ham

BigO
03-31-2013, 01:46 PM
We went with smoked Prime Rib:

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t107/orson69/DSC02420_zps3882fd4d.jpg

Plated up with mashed potatoes and gravy, green bean casserole, shoepeg corn, and Tuscan roasted garlic bread:

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t107/orson69/DSC02421_zpsa41e951f.jpg

I never run the smoker anything but full, so I also did three racks of St. Louis ribs alongside it:

http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t107/orson69/DSC02422_zpsa65a20f0.jpg

Something for the cook to enjoy throughout the week.

Mad Dawg
03-31-2013, 02:32 PM
:drool:

TommyBB
03-31-2013, 05:10 PM
I've referenced our local, radio, restaurant critic. He's a bit of a snob, at times, and other times just enjoyable to listen to in the afternoons hearing folks talk about food and restaurants.

I've used this recipe a number of times now, when my Maw-in-Law doesn't want to be in control of stuff. It's a root beer glaze, and I usually double it.
Tom Fitzmorris Root Beer Glazed Ham (http://www.nomenu.com/recipes/RootBeerHam.html)

Root Beer-Glazed Baked Ham

This is without a doubt the most asked-for recipe in the history of my radio show. Demand for it rises during the holidays, but never goes away completely.

The root beer-glazed ham is a fixture on my table on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter. It's in the oven all morning (good thing my turkey is usually out on the grill!), and it makes the whole house smell good. You'll find that lots of your guests will fight over the black crusty parts of the ham. (And all the rest of it, too.)

If you live in New Orleans, I strongly urge you to buy the superb Chisesi ham for this. It's widely available at supermarkets, usually in the deli department. Otherwise, a top-quality, lean, naturally-smoked boneless ham is what you want.

One more thing: The drippings get so crusty in the pan that you'll want to use a disposable pan to bake the ham. The stuff is very hard to dislodge.

Glaze:

24 oz. (two cans) Barq's root beer
1 1/2 Tbs. pepper jelly
1 bay leaf
1 1/2 Tbs. Tabasco Caribbean style steak sauce (or Pickapeppa)
6 cloves
1 stick cinnamon
Peel and juice of one-half an orange
Peel of half a lemon

1 cured, smoked ham, 5-10 pounds
1/2 tsp. dry mustard
3/4 cup dark brown sugar

1. I usually make the glaze the night before, so I can get the ham right into the oven in the morning. Combine all the glaze ingredients in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, then lower to a simmer, and cook for about a half-hour. Strain the pan contents and discard the solids. Reduce the liquid to about a half-cup. Refrigerate if you do this in advance.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Place the ham on a rack in a disposable aluminum pan. Cut shallow gashes in a criss-cross pattern across the top half. Spoon the glaze over the ham to completely wet the surface.

3. Combine the brown sugar and the dry mustard and pat it all over the ham. Pour a half-cup of water into the pan. Put the ham in the oven at 350 degrees.

4. Spoon some of the glaze over the top of the ham at 15-minute intervals until it's all used up. Try to get some glaze on all parts of the ham. Add more water to the pan when it dries up.

5. Continue baking until the ham reaches an internal temperature of 160 degrees on a meat thermometer. Remove from the oven and allow to rest for a half-hour before carving.

Serves twenty to thirty, with leftovers.

Gamle-ged
03-31-2013, 06:17 PM
If I snort derisively at the thought of a 5-to-10 lb ham feeding twenty to thirty people, would that make me sound fat?...

OregonDuck
03-31-2013, 07:29 PM
If I snort derisively at the thought of a 5-to-10 lb ham feeding twenty to thirty people, would that make me sound fat?...

I had the exact same thought.

Briandg
03-31-2013, 07:38 PM
I figure that this person must be talking about a boneless ham. a ten pound boneless ham baked will lose about a pound of moisture. 30 people on a 9 pound boneless ham comes to a whopping 5 ounces of ham. 6 ounces for 25.

If'n you're talking about a bone in shank, you're going to be lucky to get 2 ounces of edible meat each for that many people. Give them their entree on a ritz cracker.

BigO
04-01-2013, 01:48 AM
Not to mention that bringing an already cooked ham up to 160 is going to dry that farger into a cinder. 120 tops, fer crissakes. You're just re-heating an already cooked product, not cooking it through for the first time.

Fitzmorris is a buffoon. No disrespect to you, Tommy.

Briandg
04-01-2013, 02:42 AM
unless I'm mistaken, for that matter, you don't even have to cook it to the heat of pasteurization. Between the curing and pre-cooking, it's not only sterile, it can't be carrying significant bacteria.

I get into this argument iwth my wife. she likes to cook her hams and turkeys until they fall into shreds. What a waste.

Falling off the bone is good for ribs, I guess. Not so great for poultry or ham.

grtrx
04-01-2013, 04:31 AM
ribs have collagen and connective tissue that melts

a precooked ham doesn't need to be cooked, it was precooked, you're just heating it up.

Gamle-ged
04-01-2013, 05:54 AM
I apologise if I've failed to take the "Easter" element into proper consideration. Would a "loaves and fishes" miracle extend to ham?... :naughty:

Cloud9Bob
04-01-2013, 08:35 AM
We skipped ham this Easter. Now you guys have made me sorry I did.

:homer: Ham..........Mmmmmmmmmm

Herf
04-01-2013, 03:39 PM
I went with just OJ and brown sugar using the proportions from MadDawg. And it came out great. Mrs. Herf has a huge list of what she won't eat so that left out the rest of the recipe. Same with Jason's idea. Hot anything is out on anything she might eat. I sent some home with the kids but I'll still be eating ham sandwiches for lunch all week.

The prime rib and ribs looked great, Jason.

flipflop
04-02-2013, 03:30 AM
Mrs. Herf has a huge list of what she won't eat so that left out the rest of the recipe.

All those years together and you haven't trained her correctly? :dunno:



:wink:

Briandg
04-02-2013, 03:37 AM
same here. So many things she just won't eat.

FOOD, that is. A perfect and simple example is that she will not even remotely allow meat to be cooked with fruit. Meat must be naked, served with gravy, or with vegetables like a stir fry.

If I ever reminded her that bacon is technically meat and tomatoes are technically fruits, I guarantee you she'd never, ever eat another BLT.

BigO
04-02-2013, 04:43 AM
Fortunately, Subway has prevented that conversation from taking place.

Herf
04-02-2013, 07:44 AM
All those years together and you haven't trained her correctly? :dunno:



:wink:

No training a wife but sometimes I punish her and make chili. She is so sensitive to hot peppers she will hide in the spare bedroom with the door shut. Then after I eat the chili I get to spend time in the spare bedroom (by myself).

TommyBB
04-04-2013, 08:38 PM
Not to mention that bringing an already cooked ham up to 160 is going to dry that farger into a cinder. 120 tops, fer crissakes. You're just re-heating an already cooked product, not cooking it through for the first time.

Fitzmorris is a buffoon. No disrespect to you, Tommy.

Hasn't happened to me, funnily enough.